Ships

Soyuzturtle

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#1
We have threads for tanks and aviation so I thought I would make one for ships and other watercraft. To kick things off , here is project Habakkuk. It was developed in ww2 by Britain because they needed a new aircraft carrier to protect merchant vessels in the atlantic.
At the time resources were scarce so the royal navy had an idea to make a ship made of a material called pykrete. This material was a mixture of wood and ice which proved to not melt and worked as reasonably good armour. The carrier was planned to be 610 meters long , the largest aircraft carrier ever planned. The project came to a downfall when the amount of steel needed for supports , engines and other mechanisms was greater than what was needed to build a normal aircraft carrier.
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Horus Lupercal

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#2
As WWII goes, I didn't think there was much I hadn't heard of. But it seems I a multi-million ton bergship the Allies came very close to building is one of those things.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Habakkuk

This is awesome. Completely bonkers from start to finish, but awesome. And it's not a pipe dream like the Nazi Land Kruezers, they were genuinely going to build these things to fill strategic air power gaps in the Atlantic.
 

Soyuzturtle

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I just found this interesting watercraft. The Soviet Lun class ekranoplan Was a cold war era ship resembling a large flying boat but it is technically a ship. Using the ground effect , dozens of jet engines would speed the vehicle up and it would lift out of the water and could maintain controlled flight at 3m above sea level and at speeds of up to 740 kph / 460 mph , making it the fastest warship ever made. It weighed 400 tons and only one was ever made before the dissolution of the ussr.
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Mars Pathfinder

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I just found this interesting watercraft. The Soviet Lun class ekranoplan Was a cold war era ship resembling a large flying boat but it is technically a ship. Using the ground effect , dozens of jet engines would speed the vehicle up and it would lift out of the water and could maintain controlled flight at 3m above sea level and at speeds of up to 740 kph / 460 mph , making it the fastest warship ever made. It weighed 400 tons and only one was ever made before the dissolution of the ussr. View attachment 41540
I remembered that one!! :D :D
Thats noice Soviet Orion's Craft.....
 

Mars Pathfinder

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If you want interesting ww2 ships that you might not of heard of, here's another. hnlms abraham crijnssen , was a Dutch minesweeper stationed in the Netherlands East Indies when the Japanese were advancing in the Pacific. The ship was one of the last to escape the area by disguising itself as a tropical island. View attachment 41482
When pacific comes in......
Noice tropical weather.....
 

Horus Lupercal

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(Off topic)
Im the # 20,000 message in the Non-sfs thread!
now you know how bored i am.
And just think, you could've made it something actually relevant to the post and thousands of years of naval warfare or placed it in one of the many of the other 'off topic' NonSFS threads.
 

Soyuzturtle

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Here is another naval story. During wargames in 2005 a single Swedish diesel submarine sunk the USS Ronald Reagan completely undetected while the carrier's support fleet included multiple anti submarine vessels. In modern submarine warfare , aside from visually spotting a target the only way to detect enemies is through listening for sound frequencies coming from sonar , the engines or other systems. The Gotland attack submarine remained undetected by the American task force because it used a stirling engine which operates silently because of the following. The Stirling engine works by using a contained cylinder with a fixed mass of gas permanently sealed within. In the cylinder is a piston with a buffer space below which creates a constant pressure on the bottom of it. When heat is increased at the top of the cylinder pressure increases above the piston , forcing it back down until the pressure balances out , creating movement which turns the propellor. Obviously it isn't this simple , there is alot more too it but I doubt most people would read through me explaining the fine details of the engine , as if I knew exactly how it works.
 

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Horus Lupercal

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aside from visually spotting a target the only way to detect enemies is through listening for sound frequencies coming from sonar , the engines or other systems
Plot twist, the story is true, but the above claim is not.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_anomaly_detector


I do love the Swedes. They're hideously under-rated in NATO, but they love embarrassing the Americans (this isn't the only incident of them casually ripping up the US Military)
 

Soyuzturtle

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Mooncrasher

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Mars Pathfinder

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Here is another naval story. During wargames in 2005 a single Swedish diesel submarine sunk the USS Ronald Reagan completely undetected while the carrier's support fleet included multiple anti submarine vessels. In modern submarine warfare , aside from visually spotting a target the only way to detect enemies is through listening for sound frequencies coming from sonar , the engines or other systems. The Gotland attack submarine remained undetected by the American task force because it used a stirling engine which operates silently because of the following. The Stirling engine works by using a contained cylinder with a fixed mass of gas permanently sealed within. In the cylinder is a piston with a buffer space below which creates a constant pressure on the bottom of it. When heat is increased at the top of the cylinder pressure increases above the piston , forcing it back down until the pressure balances out , creating movement which turns the propellor. Obviously it isn't this simple , there is alot more too it but I doubt most people would read through me explaining the fine details of the engine , as if I knew exactly how it works.

i remembered that one!! :D :D
 

Soyuzturtle

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Here is one of the most ambitious commercial projects in maritime history , the Freedom ship!

The basic idea behind freedom ship is that it would be a floating city. The ship was designed in the 1990s as a vessel 5900 ft ( 1800m ) long with housing for 80,000 residents , a hospital , education facilities , casino , hotel , commercial and office occupancies , duty free shopping and other facilities. It would give residents amazing views as it sailed across the world constantly , only making its inhabitants disembark for dry dock maintenance every few decades. The ship would have everything needed to live onboard featuring large outdoor areas within indents on the side of freedom ship , an international airport which could even service medium haul airliners and a small port at the stern allowed smaller vessels to moor. Ultimately this ship never reached the construction phase as it lacked funding.
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Roger Jolly

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#21
Here is one of the most ambitious commercial projects in maritime history , the Freedom ship!

The basic idea behind freedom ship is that it would be a floating city. The ship was designed in the 1990s as a vessel 5900 ft ( 1800m ) long with housing for 80,000 residents , a hospital , education facilities , casino , hotel , commercial and office occupancies , duty free shopping and other facilities. It would give residents amazing views as it sailed across the world constantly , only making its inhabitants disembark for dry dock maintenance every few decades. The ship would have everything needed to live onboard featuring large outdoor areas within indents on the side of freedom ship , an international airport which could even service medium haul airliners and a small port at the stern allowed smaller vessels to moor. Ultimately this ship never reached the construction phase as it lacked funding.
Nice, the US can replace its coastal cities with these as they sink beneath the rising seas and everyone can incubate covid and diarrhea more effectively

The Swedes handing it to the Americans reminded me of these great naval maneuvers:

First the Fitzgerald
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Then McCain...the same damn summer
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Hey, let’s not all rush to claim responsibility for 17 dead sailors, these things happen, that’s why we make purple hearts
 

Horus Lupercal

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Nice, the US can replace its coastal cities with these as they sink beneath the rising seas and everyone can incubate covid and diarrhea more effectively
Who needs enemies, when your citizens hate you even more than the Iranians do.



The Swedes handing it to the Americans reminded me of these great naval maneuvers:

First the Fitzgerald
Then McCain...the same damn summer
Hey, let’s not all rush to claim responsibility for 17 dead sailors, these things happen, that’s why we make purple hearts
Mostly because it's noteworthy the handful of times the US get embarrassed by a smaller nation. Because it's so rare.

And yeah, if you read into the reports of the Fitz and McCain accidents, they're textbook over-use, under-trained scenarios from fleet ships conducting high tempo operations. Something the Swedes just don't do. Also, the smaller nations tend to crash less, because they have less, and do less.
Unless you're the Norwegians and you lose one fifth of your nations destroyer fleet because they were fucking around in a fjord, nailed a tanker, rolled over and sank.
And the Fitz accident wasn't just the fault of the US Navy. The Japanese ship involved was also found negligent for the same reasons.


Also, reference purple hearts. The only instances a Purple Heart may be awarded is as follows:
  1. any action against an enemy of the United States;
  2. any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged;
  3. while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party;
  4. as a result of an act of any such enemy or opposing armed forces;
  5. as a result of an act of any hostile foreign force.
A peacetime, maritime accident involving civilian shipping meets none of these criteria. So the 17 sailors who died weren't awarded Purple Hearts. They were awarded boxes.
 

Mooncrasher

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Who needs enemies, when your citizens hate you even more than the Iranians do.
Some might call that patriotism. (As opposed to MAGA, which is nationalism)


Unless you're the Norwegians and you lose one fifth of your nations destroyer fleet because they were fucking around in a fjord, nailed a tanker, rolled over and sank.
That one definitely takes the cake.
 

Roger Jolly

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#24
Who needs enemies, when your citizens hate you even more than the Iranians do.





Mostly because it's noteworthy the handful of times the US get embarrassed by a smaller nation. Because it's so rare.

And yeah, if you read into the reports of the Fitz and McCain accidents, they're textbook over-use, under-trained scenarios from fleet ships conducting high tempo operations. Something the Swedes just don't do. Also, the smaller nations tend to crash less, because they have less, and do less.
Unless you're the Norwegians and you lose one fifth of your nations destroyer fleet because they were fucking around in a fjord, nailed a tanker, rolled over and sank.
And the Fitz accident wasn't just the fault of the US Navy. The Japanese ship involved was also found negligent for the same reasons.


Also, reference purple hearts. The only instances a Purple Heart may be awarded is as follows:
  1. any action against an enemy of the United States;
  2. any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged;
  3. while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party;
  4. as a result of an act of any such enemy or opposing armed forces;
  5. as a result of an act of any hostile foreign force.
A peacetime, maritime accident involving civilian shipping meets none of these criteria. So the 17 sailors who died weren't awarded Purple Hearts. They were awarded boxes.
2-5 seem kind of redundant, with proper lawyers I’m sure they could have cooked up some enemies in there, even turned it into a great story of courage against all odds on a History Channel docu-drama but our imagination is waning these days
 

Roger Jolly

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Some might call that patriotism. (As opposed to MAGA, which is nationalism)



That one definitely takes the cake.
Had to punch maga into google, seems to be one of those prehistoric words generally meaning to eat or feed...
Then I tried all caps, 0hhh...right
I can’t logically differentiate nationalism from patriotism and MAGA is just as happy go lucky baby with a funny hat as any of it but I guess that’s all off topic